Iya Femme

Creativity, Goddess, Love, Magic, Scholar

656 notes

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

"We are very saddened to learn of the passing of Mabel Williams, the legendary African-American activist, who, with her husband Robert F. Williams, fought for and carried out the right of armed self-defense against the vicious attacks of the Ku Klux Klan, militantly represented the liberation struggle of her people during exile in Cuba, China, and Africa, and continued her active lifelong engagement in social justice struggles upon their return to the US. 
Mabel Williams was born June 1, 1931 and transitioned Saturday, April 19th, 2014 at her family’s home in Detroit. There will be a Saturday homegoing in Detroit on April 26th, 2014 and she will be returned to Monroe, North Carolina shortly thereafter according to her son John Williams.
The Freedom Archives is honored to be able to offer these audio and video selections as a special tribute to Mabel Williams—the legendary African-American freedom fighter who we’ve had the good fortune to work closely with on several documentaries and events. Mabel Williams has made lifelong contributions in her own right and this needs to be recognized and celebrated.  Yes, she was the lifelong comrade and companion of her justly famous husband Robert F. Williams—and she was with him every step of their courageous way—in Monroe North Carolina where, as NAACP leaders, they and other activists organized for racial equality and dramatized the right of self-defense against the vicious attacks of the Ku Klux Klan—with Mabel defending her home, Robert, and her two sons with shotgun and determination.
While she often downplayed her role, Mabel, among many other activities, illustrated and wrote articles for their influential newsletter The Crusader, narrated and selected music for their radio program from Cuba, “Radio Free Dixie,” collaborated on the famous book, Negroes with Guns, was a strong voice for her people in Canada, Cuba, Mexico, Moscow, China, Japan, Vietnam, Europe, and Africa, and met with revolutionary leaders, such as Fidel Castro, Ho Chi Minh, and Mao Zedong,
There could be no more fitting tribute than to highlight this woman whose militant anti-racist internationalism is powerfully expressed in her lifetime of dedicated energy around the world, then returning again to the Empire from which they had been exiled, and where she continued her social activism. We hope these selections from programs of the Freedom Archives and from an interview by Walter Turner on his radio program “Africa Today” provide insight into the lasting liberation legacy of Mabel Williams.” 
Source: http://www.freedomarchives.org/Mabel.html

fuckyeahmarxismleninism:

"We are very saddened to learn of the passing of Mabel Williams, the legendary African-American activist, who, with her husband Robert F. Williams, fought for and carried out the right of armed self-defense against the vicious attacks of the Ku Klux Klan, militantly represented the liberation struggle of her people during exile in Cuba, China, and Africa, and continued her active lifelong engagement in social justice struggles upon their return to the US.

Mabel Williams was born June 1, 1931 and transitioned Saturday, April 19th, 2014 at her family’s home in Detroit. There will be a Saturday homegoing in Detroit on April 26th, 2014 and she will be returned to Monroe, North Carolina shortly thereafter according to her son John Williams.

The Freedom Archives is honored to be able to offer these audio and video selections as a special tribute to Mabel Williams—the legendary African-American freedom fighter who we’ve had the good fortune to work closely with on several documentaries and events. Mabel Williams has made lifelong contributions in her own right and this needs to be recognized and celebrated.  Yes, she was the lifelong comrade and companion of her justly famous husband Robert F. Williams—and she was with him every step of their courageous way—in Monroe North Carolina where, as NAACP leaders, they and other activists organized for racial equality and dramatized the right of self-defense against the vicious attacks of the Ku Klux Klan—with Mabel defending her home, Robert, and her two sons with shotgun and determination.

While she often downplayed her role, Mabel, among many other activities, illustrated and wrote articles for their influential newsletter The Crusader, narrated and selected music for their radio program from Cuba, “Radio Free Dixie,” collaborated on the famous book, Negroes with Guns, was a strong voice for her people in Canada, Cuba, Mexico, Moscow, China, Japan, Vietnam, Europe, and Africa, and met with revolutionary leaders, such as Fidel Castro, Ho Chi Minh, and Mao Zedong,

There could be no more fitting tribute than to highlight this woman whose militant anti-racist internationalism is powerfully expressed in her lifetime of dedicated energy around the world, then returning again to the Empire from which they had been exiled, and where she continued her social activism. We hope these selections from programs of the Freedom Archives and from an interview by Walter Turner on his radio program “Africa Today” provide insight into the lasting liberation legacy of Mabel Williams.” 

Source: http://www.freedomarchives.org/Mabel.html

(via anarchistpeopleofcolor)

152 notes

musaafer:

readyokaygo:

Women - both within and without the United States - are being dramatically affected by war as currently waged by that country. But there has been little public space for dialogue about the complex relationship between feminism, women, and U.S. war. The editors have brought together a diverse set of scholars and activists who examine the questions raised by ongoing U.S. military initiatives. These theorists and organizers develop an anti-racist, feminist politics that brings to the foreground an analysis both of imperialist power and forms of resistance to it.  The questions they raise include: what are the implications of an imperial nation state laying claim to women’s liberation and did U.S. intervention and invasion in fact result in liberation for women in Afghanistan and Iraq? [Read]

Good book. I’m using lots of this for my thesis.

musaafer:

readyokaygo:

Women - both within and without the United States - are being dramatically affected by war as currently waged by that country. But there has been little public space for dialogue about the complex relationship between feminism, women, and U.S. war. The editors have brought together a diverse set of scholars and activists who examine the questions raised by ongoing U.S. military initiatives. These theorists and organizers develop an anti-racist, feminist politics that brings to the foreground an analysis both of imperialist power and forms of resistance to it.  The questions they raise include: what are the implications of an imperial nation state laying claim to women’s liberation and did U.S. intervention and invasion in fact result in liberation for women in Afghanistan and Iraq? [Read]

Good book. I’m using lots of this for my thesis.

(via the-uncensored-she)

7,144 notes

dynamicafrica:

"Bloom": VLISCO’s Spring 2014 Lookbook.

In their latest Spring 2014 lookbook, Vlisco, the Dutch Wax clothing and textile brand with a strong presence in West and Central Africa, reinterprets florals with their appropriately titled ‘Bloom’ collection.

i love everything about these pics… but seriously where can i get a pair of those shoes… damn! they are perfect… #FemmeLife

175 notes

biscuitsandgravyzine:

Biscuits & Gravy Zine
Volume 1: Love, Resilience, Possibilities
Biscuits & Gravy is a zine seeking to uplift and centralize the unique experiences of Southern Black and Brown Femmes in Queer culture. This zine aims to envision what community can look like when Black and Brown Femmes have the space to share our stories, lives, pain, love, and bodies on our own terms.
Biscuits & Gravy is a project grounded in anti-oppression, intentional solidarity, and authentic accountability in recognition of the institutional systems of power and global dominance that furthers white supremacy, colonialism, patriarchy, classism, ableism, anti-blackness, transmisogyny, cultural genocide, and various other forms of marginalization and violence.
The theme of our first issue will be “Love, Resilience, and Possibilities.” In a November 2012 interview, poet, writer, editor and educator Warsan Shire stated, “At the end of the day, it isn’t where I came from. Maybe home is somewhere I’m going and never have been before.”
Let’s envision what home can be. How will we love? How will we persevere? How do we reach a place, a love, a world, for which we have no blueprint. Biscuits & Gravy seeks submissions from Black and Brown Queer Femmes grappling with these questions, desiring transformation. Please submit works up to 1000 words. Submissions can be, but are not limited to:
poetry, fiction, personal stories
photos/selfies
artwork
collages
quotes
music
Please send your submissions for consideration to biscuitsandgravyzine@gmail.com. Deadline for submissions is May 30th, 2014.

biscuitsandgravyzine:

Biscuits & Gravy Zine

Volume 1: Love, Resilience, Possibilities

Biscuits & Gravy is a zine seeking to uplift and centralize the unique experiences of Southern Black and Brown Femmes in Queer culture. This zine aims to envision what community can look like when Black and Brown Femmes have the space to share our stories, lives, pain, love, and bodies on our own terms.

Biscuits & Gravy is a project grounded in anti-oppression, intentional solidarity, and authentic accountability in recognition of the institutional systems of power and global dominance that furthers white supremacy, colonialism, patriarchy, classism, ableism, anti-blackness, transmisogyny, cultural genocide, and various other forms of marginalization and violence.

The theme of our first issue will be “Love, Resilience, and Possibilities.” In a November 2012 interview, poet, writer, editor and educator Warsan Shire stated, “At the end of the day, it isn’t where I came from. Maybe home is somewhere I’m going and never have been before.”

Let’s envision what home can be. How will we love? How will we persevere? How do we reach a place, a love, a world, for which we have no blueprint. Biscuits & Gravy seeks submissions from Black and Brown Queer Femmes grappling with these questions, desiring transformation. Please submit works up to 1000 words. Submissions can be, but are not limited to:

  • poetry, fiction, personal stories
  • photos/selfies
  • artwork
  • collages
  • quotes
  • music

Please send your submissions for consideration to biscuitsandgravyzine@gmail.com. Deadline for submissions is May 30th, 2014.

(via freshmouthgoddess)

76,857 notes

thisiseverydayracism:

blackpowerisforblackmen:


Shanesha Taylor was arrested on March 20th by the Scottsdale Police for leaving her children ages 2 and 6 months in her car while she was interviewed for a job. Ms. Taylor was homeless and could not access any child care. Her desperation to provide for herself and her children and her lack of options led her to take drastic measures in search of employment. Ms. Taylor needs support & help rather than incarceration and a criminal record that will surely decrease her chances to provide for her children in the future. We ask that Maricopa County use common-sense and provide support for Ms. Taylor and her children rather than punishment.
Shanesha Taylor is still in jail pending a $9,000 bond.

Help drop the child abuse charges against Shanesha Taylor by signing this petition at change.org. Here’s the link: http://www.change.org/petitions/bill-montgomery-drop-the-child-abuse-charges-against-shanesha-taylor?recruiter=13739587&utm_campaign=twitter_link_action_box&utm_medium=twitter&utm_source=share_petition

BOOST

thisiseverydayracism:

blackpowerisforblackmen:

Shanesha Taylor was arrested on March 20th by the Scottsdale Police for leaving her children ages 2 and 6 months in her car while she was interviewed for a job. Ms. Taylor was homeless and could not access any child care. Her desperation to provide for herself and her children and her lack of options led her to take drastic measures in search of employment. Ms. Taylor needs support & help rather than incarceration and a criminal record that will surely decrease her chances to provide for her children in the future. We ask that Maricopa County use common-sense and provide support for Ms. Taylor and her children rather than punishment.

Shanesha Taylor is still in jail pending a $9,000 bond.

Help drop the child abuse charges against Shanesha Taylor by signing this petition at change.org. Here’s the link: http://www.change.org/petitions/bill-montgomery-drop-the-child-abuse-charges-against-shanesha-taylor?recruiter=13739587&utm_campaign=twitter_link_action_box&utm_medium=twitter&utm_source=share_petition

BOOST

(via the-uncensored-she)